Sheol/Hades study

Discussion in 'Bible Study' started by ATP, Feb 21, 2015.

  1. I believe Sheol/Hades is simply the grave of the unconscious where all believers and nonbelievers go to await their resurrections. Your thoughts? Blessings, ATP.
     
  2. I was watching a program about hell .. They say that when you die you don't go straight to hell or heaven but you wait as if you are asleep until Jesus returns. Then those who have their name written in the book of life will be resurrected (the first resurrection) and will be with Jesus/God in heaven for 1000 years then after the 1000 years the second resurrection will take place.. This is where the lost will be resurrected who dont have their name written in the book of life... Hell will be on earth and these lost people will be burnt with fire along with the devil and all the other fallen angels.

    I can quote text to support this or you can watch the program yourself.

    Staff Edit
    Link removed as it promotes hell in a positive manner.
    The link also contains information as to purchasing products.
    Please see our forum rules before posting. (Rule 7.1 in this case).
    http://www.christianforumsite.com/threads/forum-rules.29546/


    Bless
     
  3. I would agree with most of that, but I don't think the lake of fire is on earth anymore. Note 4 and 5 is something to consider and the word apollumi.

    Note 1: It is true that Gehenna can be a reference to the Valley of Hinnom, which is located near Jerusalem. "Gehenna" is not actually a Greek word, but it is a transliteration of a Hebrew word that literally means "Hinnom Valley." The transliterated word is found in the Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Bible, but is not found in the common Greek literary works. When we move to the New Testament, we must determine whether the use of the word gehenna is referring to the physical valley near Jerusalem or to the broader idea of a place of punishment. If the translator uses the phrase "Valley of Hinnom" when the idea of a place of punishment was meant, it is likely that people in other cultures, not knowing the valley's horrible past, will only think of the physical location and not the concept it represents.

    Note 2: The place is not the physical Hinnom Valley. Jesus said it was a place where only God had the power to cast a man (Luke 12:5). If this was the literal Hinnom Valley, anyone could put a person there. Jesus also said not to fear men who can only kill the body, but to fear God who could put both the body and soul into gehenna. Again, Jesus is not making a reference to a physical place because no physical place can contain a man's soul. Jesus also refers back to the passage in Isaiah 66:24 and states that gehenna is a place where the fire is not quenched and the decay never ends. The physical Valley of Hinnom is not eternal. Hence, we conclude that Jesus is not speaking of a physical place but using the term gehenna to refer to the place of eternal punishment. In English, this place is known by the name Hell. Why was gehenna transliterated into the Greek instead of being translated? My guess is that the Greek culture did not have a word that referred to a place of eternal punishment, hence the Hebrew term was borrowed.

    Note 3: Gehenna, being associated with these ideas, appropriately served as a symbolic designation for the place of suffering to which evil persons will be consigned following the Lord’s return.

    Note 4: When the Lord affirmed that God will “destroy” both body and soul in Gehenna (Mt. 10:28), he employed the word apollumi (used about 92 times in the New Testament). It is translated by such terms as “destroy,” “perish,” “loss,” and “lost.” The term does not suggest the sense of annihilation.

    Note 5: In every instance where the word apollumi is found in the New Testament, something other than annihilation is being described. Regarding apollumi, the idea is not extinction but ruin, loss, not of being, but of well-being."

    Note 6: The lake of fire wasn't even thought of until John penned it down in Revelation.
     
  4. @ATP you'll never become holy if you spiritualize the word of God's warnings.
     
    Major likes this.
  5. Lets be clear here on this. That is YOUR opinion and it is not the Word of God. You are of course entitled to an opinion.

    The Bible tells us in Luke 16:22-30..........
    Luke 16:22-31King James Version (KJV)
    "And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.
    And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.
    And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence. Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house: For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment."

    There it is! It is either true or it is a lie. It is to be believed or it can be rejected. The choice is of course yours.
     
    Waggles likes this.
  6. What you are doing is called......"Rationalization".
     
  7. Hi Major. Hades is only used once in the Bible as hell fire, in Luke 16:19-31. The remainder of the Bible, Hades is the grave. I would submit that in that passage Jesus is alluding to something the Pharisees would have been familiar with. The Song of Moses was a description of how Israel would turn away from Him. In the parable of Lazarus and the Rich man I believe Jesus is speaking of the priesthood and their demise. Here is the passage I believe Jesus is alluding too. Hell in this passage of Deu 32 is Sheol. Because Sheol is the grave and Gehenna is the place of fire. I think the Pharisees would see the connection between Jesus' words and the Song of Moses...

    Deu 32:18-22 KJV Of the Rock that begat thee thou art unmindful, and hast forgotten God that formed thee. 19 And when the LORD saw it, he abhorred them, because of the provoking of his sons, and of his daughters. {abhorred: or, despised} 20 And he said, I will hide my face from them, I will see what their end shall be: for they are a very froward generation, children in whom is no faith. 21 They have moved me to jealousy with that which is not God; they have provoked me to anger with their vanities: and I will move them to jealousy with those which are not a people; I will provoke them to anger with a foolish nation. 22 For a fire is kindled in mine anger, and shall burn unto the lowest hell, and shall consume the earth with her increase, and set on fire the foundations of the mountains.
     
  8. You did not respond to the verses posted from the gospel of Luke at all. Does that mean you reject them?
     
  9. ?
     
  10. Well I did respond. I'm saying that Luke was using Hades as a metaphor to describe the demise of the priesthood.

    Similar to how Jonah describes the fish as a grave, Jonah 2:2, Jonah 2:6, Matt 12:40.
     
  11. OH......so by saying that Luke used a "metaphor", the "Torments: described by JESUS in Luke 16 are also "metaphors".

    That once again is called "rationalization". Some use the word....."Spiritualization". It is the process of explaining away that which one does not believe or is unable to accept as truth.

    What you are saying is that the actual words Jesus spoke was just made up stuff, a story, a figure of speech where He used a term or phrase that was applied to something to which it is not literally applicable. That would mean that man Lazarus was not real and the man he spoke with, Abraham was not real either. Are you comfortable with calling Jesus a liar????

    Now then....Have you considered that Jonah actually died in the fish and was resurrected by God hence the word "Grave that is used in Jonah??????
     
  12. Why did Luke use Hades (the grave) to describe hell-fire?
     
  13. No, he didn't die in the fish.
     
  14. You are both correct in both your own ways on this subject. Yes, Sheol and Hades refer to the grave - a place where souls sleep waiting without consciousness or thoughts or memories until their resurrection at either the return of Christ on the Day of The Lord - many souls will be cast into the pit, the abyss the outer darkness where there will be wailing and gnashing of teeth - dread and despair.
    Or a thousand years later when all who have ever lived in the entire history of the world will rise up from Sheol/Hades to face judgment.
    At this time the Lake of Fire will come into being and not only will souls be cast there in, but also fallen angels, the Anti-Christ, the false prophet, death and Hades itself. All aspects of death, unrighteousness and of lies (deceit/untruth) will be consumed by the Lake of Fire.

    One night whilst praying in the Spirit I was praying about Scriptures in Revelation and the Lord gave a me a terrifying vision of a lake of magma or lava that was flowing, and answered my questioning concerning his judgment and those who backslide or deny him. As I was concerned by friends who had given up their walk with the Lord. Needless to say I found this a great motivating stimulant to get my own act together.
     
  15. How do you know that my friend???? Are you really sure?

    Jonah 2:2......
    “From the depths of the grave I called for help.”

    The use of Sheol, the Hebrew term for “the grave,” could mean that Jonah actually died.

    There’s another reason that some argue for Jonah’s death and resurrection.

    Matt. 12:40........
    Jesus said, “For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth” .

    The reasoning is that, since Jesus’ death and resurrection were actual, then Jonah must have also actually died and later returned to life.

    Since it was an actual, literal experience, do you believe that he could survive inside a big fish with no oxygen to breath?

    I encourage you to think about it and give it consideration.
     
  16. Hades is a Greek term used in the New Testament as a rough equivalent to the Hebrew word sheol and also describes the grave or location of the spirits of the dead. Since the NT is written in the Greek and especially Luke, he used the words that were effective for him to use. No real mystery there IMO.

    Gehenna is a Greek word used in the New Testament that referred to the Valley of Hinnom, an actual valley outside of Jerusalem known as a burning rubbish pile. When used as a term for the dead, it was a way of noting a place of judgment in the afterlife.
     
  17. Sorry my brother but I have to disagree with on this when you said...........
    " Yes, Sheol and Hades refer to the grave - a place where souls sleep waiting without consciousness or thoughts or memories until their resurrection."

    To accept that means I must reject totally the words of our Lord Jesus in Luke 16:23-28................
    "And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.
    And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.
    And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence. Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house: (MEMORY).For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment.

    Those are the words of the God-Man, Jesus Christ. I can not reject them, I can not ignore them, and I can not pretend that they do not exist simply because I do not like the idea of some of my loved ones going to the place Jesus said they would go if they rejected Him.

    IMO, To reject the words of the Lord Jesus is the same as rejecting Him and I can not and will not ever do that. I do not need a dream or a vision or a teaching from some other person. I have the Word of God and it satisfies my soul and gives me truth beyond measure.
     
  18. See comment #6.
     
  19. Jonah 2:1-4
    Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish's belly, and said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple.

    Dead men do not pray. Jonah being in the belly of an enormous fish would describe it to being in hell/hades - being taken down to the deep, the darkness.
    As for keeping Jonah alive without oxygen that is not problematic for a miracle working God. I personally know the testimonies of at least three saints here in Australia, where they all died from heart attacks and had no oxygen to their brains for over half-an-hour [Kevin Male was dead for 45 minutes with no heart beat]. And yet, when the Lord raised them up by the power of prayer in the Holy Spirit, none of them have suffered the repercussions of having no oxygen for such lengthy periods.
    Psalm 88: 4-7
    I am counted with them that go down into the pit: I am as a man that hath no strength:
    Free among the dead, like the slain that lie in the grave, whom thou rememberest no more: and they are cut off from thy hand.
    Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit, in darkness, in the deeps.
    Thy wrath lieth hard upon me, and thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves. Selah.
    Psalm 88: 10-12
    Wilt thou shew wonders to the dead? shall the dead arise and praise thee? Selah.
    Shall thy lovingkindness be declared in the grave? or thy faithfulness in destruction?
    Shall thy wonders be known in the dark? and thy righteousness in the land of forgetfulness?
     
  20. Luke 16: 22-23 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried; And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom...
    This parable is allegorical and is said to express Jesus' condemnation on the Pharisees, Scribes and others who were wealthy at the expense of the poor and needy. Failing in love and charity, and mercy. Quick to cast sins onto others, but never examining themselves.
    It is allegorical, because in all other scriptures when people die (except for a couple of Old Testament exceptions) their souls go to Sheol/Hades. You go to the grave, the land of forgetfulness. Your soul is not carried away by angels to Abraham's bosom. This is a very Jewish parable most probably also for the ears of the Sadducees that denied the resurrection of souls.
    This parable does not conflict with the Lake of Fire as the final place of torment and despair for all whose names are not written in the Book Of Life.
     

Share This Page