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This Has Been My Favorite Since About 1960

Discussion in 'Gallery' started by calvin, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. ngc3532-web.jpg
    Image of a star cluster NGC3532 captured from home using an ED80 and stacked images from a canon350d Not generally visible from the northern hemisphere.
  2. I meant to mention that the star colours are fairly accurate and not enhanced
  3. They look like Christmas lights. Did you take this (and the other one of the pulsing star) yourself?
  4. Yes, I imaged these from my backyard. This one is a stack of several images taken over about 1 hour.
    TV Libra was imaged using the same equipment, but done as 3 groups taken about 1 hour apart Each group of three was then stacked into one image, and then the resulting three images were compiled as an animation using Photoshop CS2. I cheated only in as much as I assumed the light curve would be symmetrical. So, I complied the animation as 1,2,3,3,2,1. There was a lot of processing needed to balance out the light pollution gradients that is why there is still some 'twinkling' in the other stars. the varying light pollution gradient is because the process needed to be started when the star was reasonably low toward the horizon, and finished when it was nearing the meridian (highest point). Sorry if this is a bit technical, but I'm leaving a lot out as it is:)

  5. Actually, I find that quite interesting. I was wondering why the other stars were twinkling and that explains it. I hadn't even considered tracking until just now. For some reason I was thinking it was a layering of several pictures taken at relatively short intervals, but the 6+ hour pulse cycle mentioned in the other thread should have clued me in. I also really like that the colors are relatively true, bringing out the variety of color in the cosmos.

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