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The Path to a More Simple Life

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Grow in Virtue, Feb 21, 2015.

  1. Hi everyone,

    Since February of 2014 I have been simplifying my life. Less possessions, and less distractions, with more focus on God and the things that bring my happiness.
    Below is a link to an article I wrote about the subject. Would love to know your thoughts on the subject of minimalism and simplify too.

    Article Excerpt: "When you dig deeper, you’ll find that it is quite similar to the lifestyle that God wants us to live. It’s about releasing yourself of all that is hindering you from experiencing a life that God calls you to. It is a call to action to rid ourselves of that, which is “unnecessary” in our lives, so that we may gain a strong focus on what really is necessary and what gives our lives true meaning."

    God bless,

  2. I admire your strategy and find much support in scripture for the Christian to diminish their focus and dependency regarding natural things, yet it is not the delegated mission of all people, in all circumstances, and in all places to be a minimalist; for in variance a Christian’s mission may be unique. The minimalist spiritual philosophy is two thousand years old and has materialized in many doctrinal and denominational positions, yet in variance when vigilance is absent, it often moves to compulsory despotism and arbitrary violence which mutates to a weapon of conservative violence against an innocent society. It is by a compulsory minimalist philosophy that governments have thrashed all good people to suffer rape, genocide, starvation and slavery.

    The analogous key to empower your own “natural right” to embrace the minimalist philosophy from scripture, is to keep scriptural "non-aggression" paramount, and ethical, which stands upon the virtuous foundation of Natural Rights Theory from scripture; for it is a famous conservative error to then "punitively judge" or "condemn" our brothers, sisters or nation for not adopting minimalism; for to some an honest delegation of business excellence can materialize to a formidable weapon against the arbitrary powers of despotic violence that often will slay an entire country without mercy.

    For someone must "own what is the natural world” (ownership is the highest authority under God). Who shall own it? Did not God delegate the earth for us to own it? Is it not "just" for us to own by Gods own delegation? Shall it be those that are evil or those who are righteous who shall own?

    I advocate that honest individual economic independence supported by Natural Rights Theory is critical to a countries survival against the methodical onslaught of despotism. Yet this position is fortified with scriptural integrity when Christ is our unconditional Lord instead of mammon.
    Fish_of_Faith likes this.
  3. Well, I think Jesus lived simply so he could focus on his ministry and he did say to his disciples to drop everything and follow him, and to the rich man to sell all he had to the poor.
    So if you doing that its a good thing cos few rich men can enter heaven. They are just too caught up in the distractions of the world and the word in their hearts gets choked out.

    People that are hoarders scare me. One day someone could be buried alive in all that junk!!
    You cant take it with you I suppose. So..look after the things you do have, dont covet and be generous with what you do have I suppose. No point going into debt.
    Grow in Virtue likes this.
  4. I think it fair to assert as a general observation that Americans consume more than is good for them. I am guilty. More and bigger, in the context of consumerism, cannot be Biblically supported. But this would not seem to be the case for expansion of our own personal estates, in which case things become less universal. Doing well and doing good are not mutually exclusive as a matter of fact even if it might appear that it is seldom matched.
    Siloam likes this.

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