Sketch of a Galilean

Discussion in 'Gallery' started by Egraine, Jun 27, 2017.

  1. #1 Egraine, Jun 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2017
    image.jpeg Using my extremely limited physical anthropological knowledge and my even more severely limited sketching abilities, I drew this picture what a Hebrew from Galilee might have looked like 2000 years ago. I showed the sketch to my uncle, and he said that National Geographic did a similar thing a few years ago. He said that the picture I drew is very similar to the National Geographic rendition. Given that it has some accuracy I thought that I would show it here.

    He also reminded me that it doesn't matter what Jesus may or may not have looked like, except in the sense that creating an image that is appealing to the eye enough that it becomes an object of worship is a problem. He believes that if we knew exactly what Jesus looked like, it might well distract from Jesus' message and the true purpose of His existence. I agree with this viewpoint. What I personally find particularly disturbing is when people show physical devotion to statues and other images. The thing that I wonder about is that just because the image or idol is of Christ, does that make it okay to worship it? My instincts tell me no, but I know that others will likely tell me that people aren't really praying to the idol, but what it represents to them spiritually.

    PS: Apologies for the severely bad art, but I thought it might be interesting to know what a person from that time period and region might have looked like.
     
    QuintusZ likes this.
  2. I trust your instincts, for that was my thought also. Anything that is physically here on this earth and prayed to in my opinion is idol worship. It does not matter if it's a representation of Christ or not.

    People can say that it puts things into perspective and is a spiritual connection... but in the end it becomes a person putting more value in the created object, instead of the creator Himself.

    Great sketch I thought :)
     

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