Setting up wireless in house

Discussion in 'Technology and Internet' started by Fish Catcher Jim, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. My complex offers high speed Internet. Not bad price compared to phone company wifi set ups.

    Any way from what I know I should be able to set up the cable modem and wifi router without a normal computer using a smart phone and possibly a ip finder app etc.

    Any suggestions on better modems and wifi routers and combo vs separate and so forth.

    Thank you and blessings
    FCJ
     
  2. Does the cable company not provide a modem themselves?
     
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  4. No its something we have to buy, they said
     
  5. I have had experience with DSL and tower based internet, but both companies provided a modem/router or at least an injector. If you buy the router is there any assistance or guidance from the cable company in setting it up? Typically a Wi-Fi system has to be configured first, then a cell phone detects the Wi-Fi and you log on to the Wi-Fi with the phone (using a password if it's secured.) The configuring is typically done with a laptop connected to the modem/router. But cable internet may be done differently. In regards to your question, I've used Rosewill and Belkin routers...they seemed to work okay.
     
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  6. I've not done it nut I'd guess your easiest way would be to find a wireless router that already has a default wi-i set up. Yould only need to find the routers IP and should be able to configure it via a browser to the phone.

    I wouldn't guess there is any reason to go for separates. I'd do it if the WAN connection came in at a remote place and I wanted the best WI_FI coverage in say the living room or somewhere more central but I'm on a phone line here and you'd loos speed with a long phone cable extension.

    I do used both a wireless router and a wireless access point here but that it to get good covarage in the most important areas of what is a bit of an awkward L shaped bungalow...

    Makes, I've not had trouble with cheap brands like TP link but I've gone "posh"/small buisness class as I wanted some extra features (eg. 2 LANS). I am using Draytek equipment and apart from an issue with ADSL speed (I connect the router to a very cheep Bullion which I use as a modem to resolve this), I'e been happy with their stuff. Another more upmarket make is Cisco but I had a nightmare with one of their lower end wireless router (RV180W???) That said, the brand generally has a very good reputation.
     
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  7. One other thought. You might want to look for something dual band if your devices support it. I believe the 5Ghz range doesn't travel as far and the band can be less crowded. It may be useful if you are in a block with lots of other wifi users.
     
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  8. Today's cable modems generally come with wifi. Once it's online, you can look at the bottom to get the IP address, usually 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1. Once in, read the manual for the default ID and password. YOU MUST CHANGE THE PASSWORD. Because if you don't, others can sign in too, sucking up the bandwidth you're paying for. It's easy to do. Once your device is connected, look for the wifi client section and limit it to just those devices by MAC address. You can use youtube to find all this so you don't have to wonder about how-to. Or ask the guy who'll install it from the company to help. That's it. You're all set.
     
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  9. Netgear brand equipment has always been a good choice for my Chapel office network. Never had one go bad and the Netgear Genie software to manage the system is user friendly. Visiting the following link may provide some helpful information:

    https://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/
     
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  10. I think the address choice is wider than that. See here for one list; http://www.techspot.com/guides/287-default-router-ip-addresses/

    But they will almost certainly be in a private address space such as 192.168.x.x or the 10.xx.xx.xx range by default. I think my Cisco was a 10.0.0.1. An automatically assigned IP address (the usual) would at least put you on the right network.
     
  11. You've all lost me with this tech talk now. :rolleyes:
    Fish Catcher Jim, I hope you find a solution that's right for you.
     
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  12. Thank you every one for your help and experience.

    I have decided to pass on the cable and WiFi in home and go with a pay as you go unlimited deal with sprint and this phone.

    It makes more sense for me at this time and I don't want to enter into a contract with not knowing how much longer I will be here in this complex.

    So thank you again
    Blessings
    FCJ
     
    Cturtle likes this.
  13. Glory to God !!
    I am up and running again on my own line.
    Blessings
    FCJ
     
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