Humility !

Discussion in 'Bible Study' started by Daniels, Aug 6, 2007.

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  1. The black hand—must then part with its white glove!

    (William Secker, "The Consistent Christian" 1660)

    There is in the same rose—honey for the bee, and poison for the spider.

    The same Jesus who shall say, "Come, you who are blessed by My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world!" will also say, "Depart from Me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the Devil and his angels!"

    As both blessing and cursing proceed out of the mouth of the same man—so both blessing and cursing will come out of the mouth of the same Christ! Man's curse is a curse of wicked execration—but Christ's curse is a curse of righteous execution.

    As the same wind—may send one vessel into the haven, and sink another in the ocean; so shall the same voice of Christ—doom the sinner to eternal damnation, and welcome the saint to eternal salvation! That same gate which is opened for a citizen to go abroad for recreation, may also be opened for a malefactor to go out to execution!

    Reader, how sad is that tragedy—which shall never be ended! Ah, how can you hear the doleful knell—of an everlasting funeral! Will those transient glances at former prosperity, lessen the intolerable weight of eternal calamity? The wheat and the chaff may grow together—but they shall not always lie together. There may be but of a few moments of breathing, between the sinner—and his everlasting burning! The day of separation, will prove to him a day of retribution. While the wheat is secured in the garner—the tares are consumed in the fire!

    Sinner, you would then give a thousand worlds—to be the companion of the godly! Then their enjoyments will be incomparably pleasant—while your torments shall be intolerably painful. The sea of damnation—will not be sweetened with a drop of compassion! If once you fall into hell—after millions of ages have elapsed—you will be as far from coming out, as you were at going in! There will not be a sinner in heaven—to interrupt the joys of saints; nor will there be a saint in hell—to soften or soothe the anguish of sinners!

    How will those ministers appear—who like the dog and wolf—combine to macerate and fleece the flock! Who instead of nurturing the child—have strangled the child!

    How will fair-faced, gilded professors appear—when they shall be found no better than hell's freeholders! How will they appear—when the painted sepulcher shall be opened—and the dead men's bones disclosed! They will not be judged by the whiteness of their hands—but by the blackness of their hearts! The black hand—must then part with its white glove! That solemn day of judgment, will be too critical—for the hypocritical.

     
  2. He Giveth More Grace
    He giveth more grace when the burdens grow greater,
    He sendeth more strength when the labors increase;
    To added affliction He addeth His mercy;
    To multiplied trials, His multiplied peace.

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]When we have exhausted our store of endurance,
    When our strength has failed ere the day is half done,
    When we reach the end of our hoarded resources,
    Our Father's full giving is only begun.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Fear not that thy need shall exceed His provision,
    Our God ever yearns His resources to share;
    Lean hard on the arm everlasting, availing;
    The Father both thee and thy load will upbear.
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]His love has no limit; His grace has no measure.
    His pow'r has no boundary known unto men;
    For out of His infinite riches in Jesus,
    He giveth, and giveth, and giveth again!
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Annie Johnson Flint[/FONT]
     
  3. Brother where'd you go?
     
  4. Isaiah
    60:1 Arise, shine; for thy light is come, and the glory of the LORD is
    risen upon thee.
    60:2 For, behold, the darkness shall cover the earth, and gross darkness
    the people: but the LORD shall arise upon thee, and his glory shall​
    be seen upon thee
     
  5. I am with you always


    ...lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen. - Matthew 28:20
    1. He is a risen Saviour
    "He is not here..."
    - Matthew 28:6
    2. He is a faithful promisor
    "... for he is risen, as he said"
    - Matthew 28:6
    3. He is a excellent leader
    "he goeth before you into Galilee..."
    - Matthew 28:7
    4. He is a merciful deliverer
    "...there shall ye see him"
    - Matthew 28:7
    5. He is a affectionate well-wisher
    "... behold, Jesus met them, saying, All hail."
    - Matthew 28:9
    6. He is a unique ruler
    "And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth."
    - Matthew 28:18
     
  6. Amen! God bless you brother...when our souls hit the floor he picks them back up, and He keeps them back from the pit, He fills us and revives us, He makes us walk on the hights, He's right beside us on a dark night of the soul, He will always be with us- even when we pass through the waters, and one day we will see Him as He is, and we will rejoice in the beauty of our risen Lord and Savior. We will marvel at His glory and look upon His hands that were peirced and beaar our name, we will behold the reward of our hope...we will be with the Lamb of God....until then I am confident He will continue to work in us for good. I can't wait for that day. May the Lord bless you and His people and may He shine on you today, in Jesus name I pray.
     
  7. Some beloved idol?

    (J. C. Philpot, "Spiritual Times and Seasons" 1841)

    "Because the whole land is filled with idols, and the
    people are madly in love with them.
    " Jeremiah 50:38

    Have we not all in our various ways,
    set up some beloved idol . . .
    something which engaged our affections,
    something which occupied our thoughts,
    something to which we devoted all the energies of our minds,
    something for which we were willing to labor night and day?

    Be it money,
    be it power,
    be it esteem of men,
    be it respectability,
    be it worldly comfort,
    be it literary knowledge,
    there was a secret setting up of SELF in one or
    more of its various forms, and a bowing down
    to it as an idol.


    The man of business makes money his god.

    The man of pleasure makes the lust of the flesh his god.

    The proud man makes his adored SELF his god.

    The Pharisee makes self-righteousness his god.

    The Arminian makes free-will his god.

    The Calvinist makes dry doctrine his god.

    All in one way or other, however they may differ
    in the object of their idolatrous worship, agree in
    this: that they give a preference in their esteem
    and affection to their peculiar idol, above the one
    true God.

    "Idols will be utterly abolished and destroyed."
    Isaiah 2:18

    There is, then, a time to break down these
    idols which our fallen nature has set up.

    And have not we experienced some measure of
    this breaking down, both externally and internally?

    Have not our idols been in a measure smashed
    before our eyes, our prospects in life cut up and
    destroyed, our airy visions of earthly happiness
    and our romantic paradises dissolved into thin air,
    our creature-hopes dashed, our youthful affections
    blighted, and the objects from which we had fondly
    hoped to reap an enduring harvest of delight
    removed from our eyes?

    And likewise, as to our religion . . .
    our good opinion of ourselves,
    our piety and holiness,
    our wisdom and our knowledge,
    our understanding and our abilities,
    our consistency and uprightness;
    have they not all been broken down, and
    made a heap of ruins before our eyes?

     
  8. Jesus sees every incident
    - Matthew 9
    1. Salvation
    And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.
    - Matthew 9:2

    2. Association
    And as Jesus passed forth from thence, he saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed him.
    - Matthew 9:9

    3. Commendation
    But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour.
    - Matthew 9:22

    4. Resurrection
    And when Jesus came into the ruler's house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise,
    - Matthew 9:23

    5. Supplication
    But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd.
    - Matthew 9:36

     
  9. The Sufferings Of Christ
    by Zac Poonen

    What did Paul mean when he said, “In my flesh I do my share on behalf of His body, which is the church, in filling up what is lacking in Christ's afflictions” (Col.1:24)?

    Was there anything lacking in Christ’s sufferings? Certainly not. He cried, “It is finished” on the cross. What then did Paul mean by saying that he had to complete what was lacking in Christ’s sufferings?

    Jesus had two types of sufferings - one external (physical); the other inward (spiritual). His external sufferings would have begun in small ways as He grew up in Nazareth and ended with great pain on Calvary – and most of these sufferings were visible to others. But His inward sufferings were invisible and unknown to others.
    Only a small percentage of believers in these 20 centuries have had to suffer externally (physically) for the gospel's sake. But every believer is called to share in Christ's inward sufferings.
    What are those inward sufferings? Paul said that he longed for “the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings” (Phil.3:10).

    The opposite of suffering is pleasure. When we are tempted to sin, we have a choice – either to give pleasure to our flesh or to allow the flesh to suffer. This is true even when we are tempted to have our own way in some small matter, or when we are tempted to speak a rude word to someone who hurt us. Christ NEVER chose the way of pleasing the flesh even once (See Rom.15:3). He always chose the way of suffering in the flesh. That was why He never sinned. If we choose that way ourselves, we are promised in God’s Word that we also will stop sinning (1 Pet.4:1,2). When it says there that “Christ suffered in the flesh”, it means that Christ always said “No” to His own will (John 6:38).

    Jesus never prayed even once to be saved from physical suffering or death. But He did pray “with loud crying and tears” (Heb.5:7), to His Father to be saved from "spiritual death". Spiritual death is the death that comes as a result of sinning (Ezek.18:4) – and “to sin” basically means “to do your own will instead of God’s will”. Jesus always denied His own will and did His Father’s will. So His cry of "It is finished" on the cross, meant two things: First of all, it meant that He had finished atoning for all of man’s sins. Secondly, it meant that He had finished facing the entire range of temptations to sin (that is possible for Adam’s race) and overcome all of them. He had “been tempted in all points as we are” (Heb.4:15) and “suffered in the flesh” in every one of those temptations and thus NEVER sinned.

    Today, we are called to fellowship with our Lord in these inward sufferings of His and thus overcome "even as He overcame" (Rev.3:21), and “stop sinning” (1 Cor.15:34; 1 John 2:1).

    So when Paul spoke of "filling up that which is lacking in Christ's sufferings" (Col.1:24), what he was saying was that He had not yet (even at the age of about 63 when he wrote Colossians) completed the entire range of suffering in the flesh that Christ had completed in 33½ years. But Paul did want to complete all those sufferings. He also says there that he wanted to go through these sufferings “for the sake of the Body of Christ”. He knew that under the new covenant, that was the only way by which he could minister life to the church. “As death works in us, life will work in you” (2 Cor.4:12). This is how we also are all called to serve the Body of Christ (See 2 Cor.1:4-8 as well). We must first suffer in the flesh in our private lives and thus overcome sin. Then the words that we speak will have spiritual authority.
    At the end of the sermon on the mount, it is written that Jesus taught " as one having authority” ( Mt.7:28,29) This verse is translated in THE MESSAGE translation thus: "It was apparent that Jesus was living everything he was saying - quite a contrast to the religion teachers! This was the best teaching the crowd had ever heard."

    The best teaching we can ever give to others is that which comes through the strength that we receive from God when we are faithful to suffer in the flesh in the moments of temptation – when we live what we preach. Jesus first DID and THEN taught (Acts 1:1). Let us also do the same.
    He who has ears to hear, let him hear.
     
  10. The Sufferings Of Christ
    by Zac Poonen

    What did Paul mean when he said, “In my flesh I do my share on behalf of His body, which is the church, in filling up what is lacking in Christ's afflictions” (Col.1:24)?

    Was there anything lacking in Christ’s sufferings? Certainly not. He cried, “It is finished” on the cross. What then did Paul mean by saying that he had to complete what was lacking in Christ’s sufferings?

    Jesus had two types of sufferings - one external (physical); the other inward (spiritual). His external sufferings would have begun in small ways as He grew up in Nazareth and ended with great pain on Calvary – and most of these sufferings were visible to others. But His inward sufferings were invisible and unknown to others.
    Only a small percentage of believers in these 20 centuries have had to suffer externally (physically) for the gospel's sake. But every believer is called to share in Christ's inward sufferings.
    What are those inward sufferings? Paul said that he longed for “the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings” (Phil.3:10).

    The opposite of suffering is pleasure. When we are tempted to sin, we have a choice – either to give pleasure to our flesh or to allow the flesh to suffer. This is true even when we are tempted to have our own way in some small matter, or when we are tempted to speak a rude word to someone who hurt us. Christ NEVER chose the way of pleasing the flesh even once (See Rom.15:3). He always chose the way of suffering in the flesh. That was why He never sinned. If we choose that way ourselves, we are promised in God’s Word that we also will stop sinning (1 Pet.4:1,2). When it says there that “Christ suffered in the flesh”, it means that Christ always said “No” to His own will (John 6:38).

    Jesus never prayed even once to be saved from physical suffering or death. But He did pray “with loud crying and tears” (Heb.5:7), to His Father to be saved from "spiritual death". Spiritual death is the death that comes as a result of sinning (Ezek.18:4) – and “to sin” basically means “to do your own will instead of God’s will”. Jesus always denied His own will and did His Father’s will. So His cry of "It is finished" on the cross, meant two things: First of all, it meant that He had finished atoning for all of man’s sins. Secondly, it meant that He had finished facing the entire range of temptations to sin (that is possible for Adam’s race) and overcome all of them. He had “been tempted in all points as we are” (Heb.4:15) and “suffered in the flesh” in every one of those temptations and thus NEVER sinned.

    Today, we are called to fellowship with our Lord in these inward sufferings of His and thus overcome "even as He overcame" (Rev.3:21), and “stop sinning” (1 Cor.15:34; 1 John 2:1).

    So when Paul spoke of "filling up that which is lacking in Christ's sufferings" (Col.1:24), what he was saying was that He had not yet (even at the age of about 63 when he wrote Colossians) completed the entire range of suffering in the flesh that Christ had completed in 33½ years. But Paul did want to complete all those sufferings. He also says there that he wanted to go through these sufferings “for the sake of the Body of Christ”. He knew that under the new covenant, that was the only way by which he could minister life to the church. “As death works in us, life will work in you” (2 Cor.4:12). This is how we also are all called to serve the Body of Christ (See 2 Cor.1:4-8 as well). We must first suffer in the flesh in our private lives and thus overcome sin. Then the words that we speak will have spiritual authority.
    At the end of the sermon on the mount, it is written that Jesus taught " as one having authority” ( Mt.7:28,29) This verse is translated in THE MESSAGE translation thus: "It was apparent that Jesus was living everything he was saying - quite a contrast to the religion teachers! This was the best teaching the crowd had ever heard."

    The best teaching we can ever give to others is that which comes through the strength that we receive from God when we are faithful to suffer in the flesh in the moments of temptation – when we live what we preach. Jesus first DID and THEN taught (Acts 1:1). Let us also do the same.
    He who has ears to hear, let him hear.
     
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