How did Aaron remain silent?

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by autumn oddity, Oct 28, 2014.

  1. I think the book of Leviticus ( 10:1-4) records his event.

    Well, two of his sons died bc they burned a different kind of fire

    Then the remaining two were yelled at by Moses..(10:16)

    And then of course, the whole golden calf thing, where moses told Him God himself was ready to destroy him.

    I just wonder how he stayed silent despite such discouragement, your kids dying, your brother getting angry at the remaining ones ( 10:16) and God itching to destroy you.....
    Bc alot of people feel betrayed ,abandoned etc by God or people who represent Him and I think Aaron's experience could of been of great comfort ..but sadly not much is written about it except...

    That He was silent.
     
  2. I think it was just silence of acceptance?
     
  3. Silence would signify that he knew what his sons did was wrong. God very often judges severely when He is beginning something new and there is an infraction like with Adam and Eve and even Ananias and Sapphira.

    IMO God wants all to know the seriousness of our disobedience and make a public example of its results as a warning to others.
     
    autumn oddity likes this.
  4. True, but in other versions it reads

    " He held his *peace*"

    And thats what I kinda want to focus on.

    I just wonder how , after everything that went down, he didnt hate God...

    Bc , i mean, those were his children....
    and God took them.

    What if you were Aaron ( I think it'd be a lot easier for those who are parents to imagine) ..

    What if God took your kids, even though they did what was wrong.... what if you warned them like Eli... but God still took them.

    How would you hold your peace?

    I guess thats the part i really just want to know, if I could sit dwn and hve a one on one with aaron or conversation would revolve around that...

    How did he push past that pain of losing his sons, God wanting to destroy him and his brother giving his remaining sons the 3rd degree:

    Going through something like that would make you give up, and lose faith..

    But He didn't. ..and I wonder how..thats all.

    Still, thanks for your answer major and ravi
     
  5. True, but in other versions it reads

    " He held his *peace*"

    And thats what I kinda want to focus on.

    I just wonder how , after everything that went down, he didnt hate God...

    Bc , i mean, those were his children....
    and God took them.

    What if you were Aaron ( I think it'd be a lot easier for those who are parents to imagine) ..

    What if God took your kids, even though they did what was wrong.... what if you warned them like Eli... but God still took them.

    How would you hold your peace?

    I guess thats the part i really just want to know, if I could sit dwn and hve a one on one with aaron or conversation would revolve around that...

    How did he push past that pain of losing his sons, God wanting to destroy him and his brother giving his remaining sons the 3rd degree:

    Going through something like that would make you give up, and lose faith..

    But He didn't. ..and I wonder how..thats all.

    Still, thanks for your answer major and ravi
     
  6. True, but in other versions it reads

    " He held his *peace*"

    And thats what I kinda want to focus on.

    I just wonder how , after everything that went down, he didnt hate God...

    Bc , i mean, those were his children....
    and God took them.

    What if you were Aaron ( I think it'd be a lot easier for those who are parents to imagine) ..

    What if God took your kids, even though they did what was wrong.... what if you warned them like Eli... but God still took them.

    How would you hold your peace?

    I guess thats the part i really just want to know, if I could sit dwn and hve a one on one with aaron or conversation would revolve around that...

    How did he push past that pain of losing his sons, God wanting to destroy him and his brother giving his remaining sons the 3rd degree:

    Going through something like that would make you give up, and lose faith..

    But He didn't. ..and I wonder how..thats all.

    Still, thanks for your answer major and ravi
     
  7. Hi pancakes,

    To whom much is given, much is required. This generation of Israelites lived in the presence of Yahweh, heard his voice, seen his wonders and received his blessings. Aaron's demeanor and actions isn't all that surprising. We all have differences when facing adversity, and Aaron, after considering his options, chose to be silent.

    God bless!
     

  8. One interesting commentary on these verses from a book called Patriarch and Prophets says this (lengthy but worth reading and interesting):

    Next to Moses and Aaron, Nadab and Abihu had stood highest in Israel. They had been especially honored by the Lord, having been permitted with the seventy elders to behold His glory in the mount. But their transgression was not therefore to be excused or lightly regarded. All this rendered their sin more grievous. Because men have received great light, because they have, like the princes of Israel, ascended to the mount, and been privileged to have communion with God, and to dwell in the light of His glory, let them not flatter themselves that they can afterward sin with impunity, that because they have been thus honored, God will not be strict to punish their iniquity. This is a fatal deception. The great light and privileges bestowed require returns of virtue and holiness corresponding to the light given. Anything short of this, God cannot accept. Great blessings or privileges should never lull to security or carelessness. They should never give license to sin or cause the recipients to feel that God will not be exact with them. All the advantages which God has given are His means to throw ardor into the spirit, zeal into effort, and vigor into the carrying out of His holy will. {PP 359.3}




    God designed to teach the people that they must approach Him with reverence and awe, and in His own appointed manner. He cannot accept partial obedience. It was not enough that in this solemn season of worship nearly everything was done as He had directed. God has pronounced a curse upon those who depart from His commandments, and put no difference between common and holy things. He declares by the prophet: “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness! ... woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight! ... which justify the wicked for reward, and take away the righteousness of the righteous from him! ... They have cast away the law of the Lord of hosts, and despised the word of the Holy One of Israel.” Isaiah 5:20-24. Let no one deceive himself with the belief that a part of God’s commandments are nonessential, or that He will accept a substitute for that which He has required. Said the prophet Jeremiah, “Who is he that saith, and it cometh to pass, when the Lord commandeth it not?” Lamentations 3:37. God has placed in His word no command which men may obey or disobey at will and not suffer the consequences. If men choose any other path than that of strict obedience, they will find that “the end thereof are the ways of death.” Proverbs 14:12. {PP 360.2}


    “Moses said unto Aaron, and unto Eleazar and unto Ithamar, his sons, Uncover not your heads, neither rend your clothes; lest ye die, ... for the anointing oil of the Lord is upon you.” The great leader reminded his brother of the words of God, “I will be sanctified in them that come nigh Me, and before all the people I will be glorified.” Aaron was silent. The death of his sons, cut down without warning, in so terrible a sin—a sin which he now saw to be the result of his own neglect of duty—wrung the father’s heart with anguish, but he gave his feelings no expression. By no manifestation of grief must he seem to sympathize with sin. The congregation must not be led to murmur against God.{PP 361.1}"

    The Lord would teach His people to acknowledge the justice of His corrections, that others may fear. There were those in Israel whom the warning of this terrible judgment might save from presuming upon God’s forbearance until they, too, should seal their own destiny. The divine rebuke is upon that false sympathy for the sinner which endeavors to excuse his sin. It is the effect of sin to deaden the moral perceptions, so that the wrongdoer does not realize the enormity of transgression, and without the convicting power of the Holy Spirit he remains in partial blindness to his sin. It is the duty of Christ’s servants to show these erring ones their peril. Those who destroy the effect of the warning by blinding the eyes of sinners to the real character and results of sin often flatter themselves that they thus give evidence of their charity; but they are working directly to oppose and hinder the work of God’s Holy Spirit; they are lulling the sinner to rest on the brink of destruction; they are making themselves partakers in his guilt and incurring a fearful responsibility for his impenitence. Many, many, have gone down to ruin as the result of this false and deceptive sympathy.{PP 361.2}
     
  9. @pancakes when really bad things happen, sometimes words are not enough to express the emotions experienced. After Job's events, he was silent for seven days. Aaron was very submissive and didn't stand for much so it's not a surprise he was silent anyhow. Just my thoughts. When Judge Eli's sons sinned, he spoke to them but did nothing, even when they were killed, but when he heard the ark was taken he fell backwards and died.
     
  10. Greetings:

    Still had a soft job.I would've been still in the kitchen and not allowed to burn his toast.

    bye
     
  11. I think, just as Ravindran said, it's more like he took in everything and accepted it. He was probably stressed out and worried. I know some people who, when under a lot of stress, cover it up and you would never know they even care about what is going on. That's just what I think.
     

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