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Funny, Interesting, Unusual English Words -- Like Sardoodledom

Discussion in 'Humor' started by TezriLi, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. Saw a video today, http://twentytwowords.com/ridiculous-word-causes-spelling-bee-contestant-and-crowd-to-crack-up/, that was fun. In the spelling bee, the young man was asked to spell sardoodledom, a word the spellchecker here does not recognize. Watch the video -- the young man, while humored by it, handles the word well.

    I didn't recognize the word either! I'd never heard it before.

    Sardoodledom. For some interesting (and differing) "facts" regarding the word, see http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-sar2.htm and http://www.oxforddnb.com/templates/article.jsp?articleid=34116&back=

    One site says that it is a mechanically contrived plot structure and stereotyped or unrealistic characterization in drama.

    Well, there are a lot of other such words. I welcome you to add your own! :D
  2. Couldn't help but giggle with the little guy in the video. :)

    My offering~
    Snollygoster - A dishonest politician, especially shrewd or calculating.
    Ghid, dUmPsTeR and TezriLi says Amen and like this.
  3. I like it! Need to remember it.

    A word I have always liked, and I rarely used it: serendipity. Gotta start using it more.
    autumn oddity likes this.
  4. lol I checked to see if sardoodledum was legit..and it totally was.

    Its a noun. O___O

    TezriLi likes this.
  5. Alice In Wonderland! Wonderful vault for great "words"!
    Nanon likes this.
  6. onomatopoeia

    TezriLi likes this.
  7. Saw this one today~
    'winklepicker'- n. – style of shoe or boot in the 1950s with a sharp and long pointed toe.
    TezriLi likes this.
  8. one of the new words recently added to the Oxford.
    I don't particularly like the word -- it's hideous.
    Saw the "word" Febuary in one dictionary. That was about par with this "word."
  9. I suppose that the word thespian gives you a moment of pause then if listicle does.
    TezriLi likes this.
  10. #10 boltardy, Aug 18, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
    I prefer Lear where I could eat with a runcible spoon and (not that's there's any unusual words in it) drink lavender water tinged with pink ( not to mention meet a Pobble doing the same)

    Says me with a grin like a Cheshire Cat (Opps that's Carrol) ;)

    (Actaully I'm not that into reading or verse but some things have stuck with me and I do like some bits.)
    TezriLi likes this.
  11. My favourite word of all though comes from a younger brother when he was young. That was "irridiculous". 30 years on, I'm still undecided as to whether I should use it as his (I think intended) "very ridiculous" or take the "ir" prefix as a negative but I prefer the former.
    TezriLi likes this.
  12. What the hek is a MUGWUMP?
  13. From the Oxford:
    Syllabification: mug·wump
    Pronunciation: /ˈməɡˌwəmp /
    North American
    A person who remains aloof or independent, especially from party politics.

    It can also mean someone who's a fence-sitter.
    Abdicate likes this.
  14. HEHEHE I saw you use that earlier :)
    TezriLi likes this.
  15. Learned that word in Political Science. :D
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  16. TezriLi likes this.
  17. TezriLi likes this.
  18. Thank you! :D
  19. My eighth grade teacher stood one day in front of us, and she said that she had learned a word, "Pneumo ... Pneumo ... " She appeared to be having trouble remembering the word.

    Without permission to speak, normally a mortal sin, I said or maybe more like I shouted, "I know this. Holy cowabunga, I know this. Supercalifragil ... I know this ... Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis. Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis."

    As I waited for the reprimand that never came, Ms B looked at me. Ms B’s look is more than a look. It is more like lightning between her eyebrows and the top rims of her glasses. "So ... Ghid, ... how do you know that?"

    I wanted to make like an earthquake drill and crawl under my desk, but she was not angry, so with as much composure as I could muster, I said, "My grandfather told me that his father told him that it was the longest word in English, and my grandfather's grandfather had a farm in Southeast Missouri in an area where the Lead Trust had mines, and some miners became sick with Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis." Then I waited for Apollo to spring from the rims of Ms B's glasses, for him to be strike me with lighning, and for him to gallop on to carry the sun across the sky.
    Abdicate likes this.
  20. So "lung disease" :) LOL
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