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Discussion in 'Thoughts for Today' started by Dusty, Sep 29, 2007.



    T for time to be together, turkey, talk, and tangy weather.
    for harvest stored away, home, and hearth, and holiday.
    for autumn's frosty art, and abundance in the heart.
    for neighbours, and October, nice things, new things to remember.
    for kitchen, kettles' croon, kith and kin expected soon.
    S for sizzles, sights, and sounds, and something special that abounds.

    There are three traditions behind our Canadian Thanksgiving Day.

    1. Long ago, before the first Europeans arrived in North America, the farmers in Europe held celebrations at harvest time. To give thanks for their good fortune and the abundance of food, the farm workers filled a curved goat's horn with fruit and grain. This symbol was called a cornucopia or horn of plenty. When they came to Canada they brought this tradition with them.
    2. In the year 1578, the English navigator Martin Frobisher held a formal ceremony, in what is now called Newfoundland, to give thanks for surviving the long journey. He was later knighted and had an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean in northern Canada named after him - Frobisher Bay. Other settlers arrived and continued these ceremonies.
    3. The third came in the year 1621, in what is now the United States, when the Pilgrims celebrated their harvest in the New World. The Pilgrims were English colonists who had founded a permanent European settlement at Plymouth Massachusetts. By the 1750's, this joyous celebration was brought to Nova Scotia by American settlers from the south.

      t the same time, French settlers, having crossed the ocean and arrived in Canada with explorer Samuel de Champlain, also held huge feasts of thanks. They even formed "The Order of Good Cheer" and gladly shared their food with their Indian neighbours.

      fter the Seven Year's War ended in 1763, the citizens of Halifax held a special day of Thanksgiving.

      he Americans who remained faithful to the government in England were known as Loyalists. At the time of the American revolution, they moved to canada and spread the Thanksgiving celebration to other parts of the country. many of the new English settlers from Great Britain were also used to having a harvest celebration in their churches every autumn.

      Eventually in 1879, Parliament declared November 6th a day of Thanksgiving and a national holiday. Over the years many dates were used for Thanksgiving, the most popular was the 3rd Monday in October. After World War I, both Armistice Day and Thanksgiving were celebrated on the Monday of the week in which November 11th occurred. Ten years later, in 1931, the two days became separate holidays and Armistice Day was renamed Remembrance Day. Finally, on January 31st, 1957, Parliament proclaimed....
    "A Day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed... to be observed on the second Monday in October."

    Did You Know?

    Americans did not invent Thanksgiving. It began in Canada. Frobisher's celebration in 1578 was 43 years before the pilgrims gave thanks in 1621 for the bounty that ended a year of hardships and death. Abraham Lincoln established the date for the US as the last Thursday in November. In 1941, US Congress set the National Holiday as the fourth Thursday in November.

    Frobisher and early colonists, giving thanks for safe passage, as well as pilgrim celebrations in the US that began the traditions of turkeys, pumpkin pies, and the gathering of family and friends.

  2. Canadian Thankgiving

    Hello, Gosh I am sorry this is so late but I am new here and this is the first time I see this. Happy Belated Thankgiving!:)
  3. Sister, that is very interesting!
    Thank you~

    Why don't the Europeans celebrate a Thanksgiving?

  4. Wow that's funny you all, digging that up now. Thanks Chaplain for the belated wishes.

    You know what I don't know why Europeans don't celebrate and the British either.

    There are only three countries that their gov. has given them a National Holiday.... U.S. Canada and the Philippines. isn't that interesting.
  5. Wow, does this mean I can get people to cook several

    thanksgiving dinners for Me during the year.:rolleyes:


    But I would have to be carefull not to forgett to give


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