Adult ADD Evaluation.

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by LysanderShapiro, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. This Wednesday, the 5th, I will be beginning an evaluation for adult ADD. I had an evaluation at a very young age and struggled with focus and managing certain tasks which involved close attention to detail. It has been, I think, a lifelong struggle (especially in my college years), but by the grace of God, pulled through.

    Nevertheless, especially with my current job which I started earlier this year, I have been finding more difficulty and seem to be falling short of valid attention.

    I'm going to get an evaluation since I am now an adult and want some clinical clarity on Adult ADD.

    Has anyone else had an evaluation as an adult? Does anyone else struggle with this? I'd love to hear your stories, thoughts, and even advice.
     
  2. I believe ADD would get worse with time, if untreated.

    What symptoms exactly are you suffering from?

    I have not gone for an evaluation but I can tick many of the symptoms. I set milestones for myself toward more sleep, fitness and note taking.
     
  3. Some people can and do grow out of it, but for those who keep it, it can get worse with time.

    I get extremely distracted and have a tough time completing even symptom tasks, I can be a horrible listener if someone is speaking to me for more than 30 seconds or so -- it is like 80% of the information stated fell by the wayside. Starting a task is very difficult. Abrupt responses is apparently a symptom, though I'd like more info -- but I have an involuntary habit of doing that. Prioritizing can be tough. I may not complete a task until the 11th hour.

    My biggest concern is my listening. Sadly, because everyone at some point may have a moment of zoning out or doing any one of those things, many people think ADD is a fake disorder and that one can simply stop if they wish to. The truth is that while anyone can have a moment of any of these, ADD is the extreme case for all of these, and they are 100% involuntary. It should never be used as an excuse, but it shouldn't be tossed aside either.
     
    KingJ likes this.
  4. I have adult ADD and was diagnosed in my early 50's. The best way I have heard it explained is: your brain works faster than normal but unlike others, your "brake" doesn't function, to slow it down. Most ADD sufferers learn early to "hyper focus" (I thought I'd invented it - silly me) to get thru. Self medication with smoking, caffeine especially are often noted. I was given a high daily doseage of adderal which was a miracle to me. The problem being that (in the US) adderal is one of the most loved to be abused prescription drugs, even beating out oxicontin, among young and really all age groups. Because of this - they don't like to prescribe it and is considered a class 2 drug. Even generic, it is an expensive drug. The problem with being diagnosed at an older age is they will use anything to contra-indicate it - high blood pressure and heart disease being big no's. A long story not gonna post, I have been off meds years due to doctoral incompetence and my age. So I'm back to dealing naturally with it. Good Luck and God bless.
     
  5. I have adult ADD and was diagnosed in my early 50's. The best way I have heard it explained is: your brain works faster than normal but unlike others, your "brake" doesn't function, to slow it down. Most ADD sufferers learn early to "hyper focus" (I thought I'd invented it - silly me) to get thru. Self medication with smoking, caffeine especially are often noted. I was given a high daily doseage of adderal which was a miracle to me. The problem being that (in the US) adderal is one of the most loved to be abused prescription drugs, even beating out oxicontin, among young and really all age groups. Because of this - they don't like to prescribe it and is considered a class 2 drug. Even generic, it is an expensive drug. The problem with being diagnosed at an older age is they will use anything to contra-indicate it - high blood pressure and heart disease being big no's. A long story not gonna post, I have been off meds years due to doctoral incompetence and my age. So I'm back to dealing naturally with it. Good Luck and God bless.
     
  6. I have adult ADD and was diagnosed in my early 50's. The best way I have heard it explained is: your brain works faster than normal but unlike others, your "brake" doesn't function, to slow it down. Most ADD sufferers learn early to "hyper focus" (I thought I'd invented it - silly me) to get thru. Self medication with smoking, caffeine especially are often noted. I was given a high daily doseage of adderal which was a miracle to me. The problem being that (in the US) adderal is one of the most loved to be abused prescription drugs, even beating out oxicontin, among young and really all age groups. Because of this - they don't like to prescribe it and is considered a class 2 drug. Even generic, it is an expensive drug. The problem with being diagnosed at an older age is they will use anything to contra-indicate it - high blood pressure and heart disease being big no's. A long story not gonna post, I have been off meds years due to doctoral incompetence and my age. So I'm back to dealing naturally with it. Good Luck and God bless.
     
  7. Thank you, Silk.
    Yes, your explanation for it is spot on. Stuttering itself is sort of a medical mystery at the moment, but most doctors are finding a direct link to ADD since the mass majority of stutterers have been diagnosed with it. I myself am a stutterer.

    I used Ritalin in my childhood, but not for very long. It was very affective, but the side effects (excessive shaking) wasn't worth it. In college, I began taking Adderal, but weened off of it later on. And yes, it's one of the most abused drugs in the US. My brother is a pharmacist and I remember having a long talk about this.

    Thank you for the encouragement and info.
     
  8. Ritalin has a lot of drawbacks, the main being steep peaks and lose your air drops. You will have noticed none of this with adderal. I'm not a stutterer. But ADD runs in families. My mother, oldest and youngest brother all had it and only the youngest was formally diagnosed. My other brother has 2 boys with it. But if you suffer from this, adderal acts in a wierd way. With people who don't have ADD, it is speedy. For people who have it, the speed, finally turns on your brake and you can see clearly, with focus. Night owls are often ADD.
     
  9. I have adult ADD and was diagnosed in my early 50's. The best way I have heard it explained is: your brain works faster than normal but unlike others, your "brake" doesn't function, to slow it down. Most ADD sufferers learn early to "hyper focus" (I thought I'd invented it - silly me) to get thru. Self medication with smoking, caffeine especially are often noted. I was given a high daily doseage of adderal which was a miracle to me. The problem being that (in the US) adderal is one of the most loved to be abused prescription drugs, even beating out oxicontin, among young and really all age groups. Because of this - they don't like to prescribe it and is considered a class 2 drug. Even generic, it is an expensive drug. The problem with being diagnosed at an older age is they will use anything to contra-indicate it - high blood pressure and heart disease being big no's. A long story not gonna post, I have been off meds years due to doctoral incompetence and my age. So I'm back to dealing naturally with it. Good Luck and God bless.
     
  10. Indeed. The good news is medications like Adderal have really improved over the last 5 years.
     
  11. At least, you have doctor’s certificate to support why you are late to submit your report/presentation : )

    In my case, I have none, just plain procrastination : )

    Yah, I need to remind myself again of 1 Thessalonians 4

    “Sanctify your work” is my favorite phrase/reminder at work ever since i heard that...as Bro. Josemaria Escriva would say…
     
  12. Rofl...while it is true ADD people are often late to appointments because we can think of 50 other things to do before (and lose track of time), I was always on time with reports weighing 50 lbs. more than they had to.
     
  13. One thing I am good with is being on time. Or rather, I'm never on time, but extremely early. Being late to something is something I am never comfortable with.
     
  14. I was diagnosed when younger, but the diagnosis was not confirmed later. What has remained consistent was symptoms described in posts on another forum which one diagnosed as adrenal fatigue.???. The younger diagnosis was add with hypo activity. I dunno. I can force myself to concentrate, usually, but I hate medicine used to assist as it makes me feel terrible. A half pill of adder all can see me stay up all night.
     
  15. Interesting topic.....

    I watched a series on PBS about adult ADD... I thought to myself - WOW, I must have this... So much of the testimony and description of the symptoms fit like a glove.... Then, reading through the posts, I think the same thing again....

    But... I have some level that I can more or less keep under control most of the times... but it does seem to ebb and flow... There are times that I just can't focus on anything at all.... Then, things clear up and I can get stuff done... It's really bad when there are exciting things going on "Away" and really boring, plodding things going on at work....

    I really hope you are able to find some relief....

    Thanks
     
  16. Every case is different - for instance, I didn't have the overt hyperactivity as a child and is one of the reasons I wasn't diagnosed earlier in life. But I have to say, had I been diagnosed earlier, I wouldn't have had the bad habits I had later. I'm unsure what you are referring to with adrenal fatique. What I can say was that I was undiagnosed until I just "burnt out" and had problems being able to function. I am trying to be careful because maybe a year after my recovery, I fell - triggering fibromyalgia (chronic fatigue secondary diagnosis). If you have problems with focus to begin with and add in 24/7 pain - focus becomes more of a problem. Functioning becomes ultra hard. Without meds, it becomes very to the 10th. (little cheese with that whine?) You have to learn to manage doseages and don't take at night. And also recognize and try and drop self medication like caffeine, alcohol, smoking and most of all recognize when you are hyperfocusing.
     
  17. I appreciate your encouragement and am happy you are finding relief. This adrenal fatigue, as I am learning, has similarities,but seems distinct. I hope this proves to be accurate and controllable...sort of getting tired of the symptoms.
     
    LysanderShapiro likes this.
  18. I really have a hard time with medical diagnosis and medication. It seems like there was a time when medication was brought about to cure an affliction; not deal with the symptoms. I would also have a hard time accepting any doctors diagnosis w/o a second opinion.

    I would say this stems from a few areas. One being: doctors are looking for something wrong with a person; and two, pharmaceutical companies seem to be coming up with ailments that require medication that needs to be taken for the rest of ones life with warning not to stop the medication, or it would be needed to step down slowly off said medication.

    I've even conversed with a physician that stopped practicing medicine because he claimed medicine caused slightly harsher effects of what certain medicine was created or propagated to relieve.

    Example: blood pressure medicine, when it wears off, slightly blood pressure rises ever so slightly higher than before meds were taken. (120/80 thus going up to 120.1/80.1)

    This doctor even lobbied that medicine for certain ailments, if given to someone w/o this ailment, would bring about this certain ailment to the one who didn't have it to begin with.

    Example: (His) therapy for cancer in one that didn't have cancer would bring cancer to fruition in that person treated.
     

Share This Page